United States presidential election in New Hampshire, 2016

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United States presidential election in New Hampshire, 2016
New Hampshire
← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →
Turnout 75.03%

  Hillary Clinton official Secretary of State portrait crop.jpg Official Portrait of President Donald Trump (cropped).jpg
Nominee Hillary Clinton Donald Trump
Party Democratic Republican
Home state New York New York
Running mate Tim Kaine Mike Pence
Electoral vote 4 0
Popular vote 348,526 345,790
Percentage 46.98% 46.61%

181px
County Results

Clinton

  40-50%
  50-60%

Trump

  40-50%
  50-60%


President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Donald Trump
Republican

The 2016 United States presidential election in New Hampshire was won by Hillary Clinton by a 0.3 percentage point margin, on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 General Election. New Hampshire voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College by a popular vote.

On February 9, 2016, in the presidential primaries, voters expressed their preferences for the Democratic, and Republican, parties' respective nominees for President. Registered members of each party only voted in their party's primary, while voters who were unaffiliated chose any one primary in which to vote.

Primary elections[edit | edit source]

As per tradition and by New Hampshire electoral laws,[1] New Hampshire holds the primaries before any other state holds them. As a result, candidates for nomination usually spend a long period campaigning in New Hampshire.

Democratic primary[edit | edit source]

New Hampshire Democratic primary, 2016
New Hampshire
← 2012 February 9, 2016 (2016-02-09) 2020 →

  x125px Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Candidate Bernie Sanders Hillary Clinton
Home state Vermont New York
Delegate count 15 9
Popular vote 152,193 95,355
Percentage 60.14% 37.68%

125px
New Hampshire results by county
  Bernie Sanders
File:Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire
File:Bernie Sanders by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Senator Bernie Sanders at a campaign event in Hooksett, New Hampshire.

In the New Hampshire Democratic primary taking place on February 9, 2016, there were 24 pledged delegates and 8 super delegates that went to the Democratic National Convention. The pledged electors were allocated in this way. 16 delegates were allocated proportionally by congressional district (8 delegates per district). The other 8 delegates were allocated based on the statewide popular vote.[2]Template:Summarize

Results[edit | edit source]

Template:2016NHDem

Republican primary[edit | edit source]

New Hampshire Republican primary, 2016
New Hampshire
← 2012 February 9, 2016 (2016-02-09) 2020 →

  Donald Trump August 19, 2015 (cropped).jpg Governor John Kasich.jpg Ted Cruz, official portrait, 113th Congress (cropped 2).jpg
Candidate Donald Trump John Kasich Ted Cruz
Home state New York Ohio Texas
Delegate count 11 4 3
Popular vote 100,735 44,932 33,244
Percentage 35.23% 15.72% 11.63%

  Jeb Bush at Southern Republican Leadership Conference May 2015 by Vadon 02.jpg Marco Rubio, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg Chris Christie April 2015 (cropped).jpg
Candidate Jeb Bush Marco Rubio Chris Christie
Home state Florida Florida New Jersey
Delegate count 3 2 0
Popular vote 31,341 30,071 21,089
Percentage 10.96% 10.52% 7.38%

New Hampshire Republican Presidential Primary Election Results by County, 2016.svg
New Hampshire results by county
  Donald Trump
File:Marco Rubio by Gage Skidmore 10.jpg
Senator Marco Rubio at a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire
File:Ted Cruz by Gage Skidmore 9.jpg
Senator Ted Cruz at a campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire
File:John Kasich by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Governor John Kasich at a campaign event in Nashua, New Hampshire

The New Hampshire Republican primary took place on February 9, 2016 where there were 23 bound delegates which were allocated proportionally and a candidate has to get at least 10% of the vote to get any delegates to the Republican National Convention.[3]Template:Summarize

Results[edit | edit source]

New Hampshire Republican primary, February 9, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
Bound Unbound Total
America Symbol.svg Donald Trump 100,735 35.23% 11 0 11
John Kasich 44,932 15.72% 4 0 4
Ted Cruz 33,244 11.63% 3 0 3
Jeb Bush 31,341 10.96% 3 0 3
Marco Rubio 30,071 10.52% 2 0 2
Chris Christie 21,089 7.38% 0 0 0
Carly Fiorina 11,774 4.12% 0 0 0
Ben Carson 6,527 2.28% 0 0 0
Rand Paul (withdrawn) 1,930 0.68% 0 0 0
Write-ins 2,912 1.02% 0 0 0
Mike Huckabee (withdrawn) 216 0.08% 0 0 0
Andy Martin 202 0.07% 0 0 0
Rick Santorum (withdrawn) 160 0.06% 0 0 0
Jim Gilmore 134 0.05% 0 0 0
Richard Witz 104 0.04% 0 0 0
George Pataki (withdrawn) 79 0.03% 0 0 0
Lindsey Graham (withdrawn) 73 0.03% 0 0 0
Brooks Andrews Cullison 56 0.02% 0 0 0
Timothy Cook 55 0.02% 0 0 0
Bobby Jindal (withdrawn) 53 0.02% 0 0 0
Frank Lynch 47 0.02% 0 0 0
Joe Robinson 44 0.02% 0 0 0
Stephen Bradley Comley 32 0.01% 0 0 0
Chomi Prag 16 0.01% 0 0 0
Jacob Daniel Dyas 15 0.01% 0 0 0
Stephen John McCarthy 12 0% 0 0 0
Walter Iwachiw 9 0% 0 0 0
Kevin Glenn Huey 8 0% 0 0 0
Matt Drozd 6 0% 0 0 0
Robert Lawrence Mann 5 0% 0 0 0
Peter Messina 5 0% 0 0 0
Unprojected delegates: 0 0 0
Total: 285,916 100.00% 23 0 23
Source: The Green Papers

General election[edit | edit source]

Polling[edit | edit source]

Results[edit | edit source]

General election results, November 8, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hillary Clinton 348,526 47.62%
Republican Donald Trump 345,790 47.25%
Libertarian Gary Johnson 30,694 4.12%
Green Jill Stein 6,465 0.87%
Independent Evan McMullin (write-in) 1,064 0.15%
[[Reform Party (United States)|Template:Reform Party (United States)/meta/shortname]] Rocky De La Fuente 677 0.1%
style="background-color: Template:N/a/meta/color; width: 2px;" | [[n/a|Template:N/a/meta/shortname]] Total Other Write-in 10,965 1.47%
Total votes 743,117 100.00%

Analysis[edit | edit source]

Hillary Clinton's margin of victory was the smallest for a Democrat in 100 years.[original research?] New Hampshire last voted for a Republican, George Bush, in 2000, and although Trump did not win New Hampshire, the county results were exactly the same in 2000 and 2016. The deciding factor,[opinion] however, were the margins.

Allegations of voting irregularities[edit | edit source]

On September 7, 2017, state House speaker Shawn Jasper announced that data showed that 6,540 people voted using out-of-state licenses. Of those, only 15% had received state licenses by August 2017. Of the remaining 5,526, only 3.3% had registered a motor vehicle in New Hampshire. In addition to the close vote for president, Democratic Senator Maggie Hassan defeated incumbent Republican Kelly Ayotte by 1,017 votes. In February 2017, President Trump had told a gathering of senators at the White House that fraudulent out-of-state voting had cost him and Ayotte the election in New Hampshire. Mainstream media disputed Trump's and Japser's assertion.[5] New Hampshire law permits New Hampshire residents to vote using out-of-state identification if they are domiciled in the state, out-of-state college students attending schools in New Hampshire being one example of such legitimate use of out-of-state identification.[6]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Gregg, Hugh (1997). "First-In-The-Nation Presidential Primary". New Hampshire Almanac. State of New Hampshire. Retrieved 4 August 2016. 
  2. "New Hampshire Democratic Delegation 2016". www.thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved 2017-02-23. 
  3. "New Hampshire Republican Delegation 2016". www.thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved 2017-02-23. 
  4. "2016 Presidential General Election Results In New Hampshire". 
  5. Weigel, David, "Election Integrity Commission members accuse New Hampshire voters of fraud", Washington Post, 8 September 2017' Scarborough, Rowan, "More than 5,000 out-of-state voters may have tipped New Hampshire against Trump", Washington Times, September 7, 2017
  6. UNH Votes, "[1]"

External links[edit | edit source]